Prototyping Interactions With a Woz Skill

Andrew Rapo
February 15, 2017

Prototyping Interactions With a Woz Skill

See: Managing Code with Custom Flow Activities See: Flows- A Dungeon Example See: MIMs

Enabling Rapid Iteration The best way to converge on a successful strategy for interaction is to iterate rapidly, testing the way users respond to Jibo’s voice, body animations, screen animations, speech recognition, touch interface, etc.

Managing Code with Custom Flow Activities

Andrew Rapo
January 20, 2017

Flow Editor Activities (Shapes) The Flow Editor provides a number of ‘activities’ (reusable shapes) that are useful for authoring flows. The core set of activities includes Begin, Parallel Begin, Flow.end, Flow.Subflow, Flow.Eval, etc. By using these activities and referencing custom skill code, just about any feature can be implemented. However, not all of the potential uses of activities have been anticipated so the SDK provides a way to implement custom activities.

Jibo SDK Program Update December 2016

Jonathan Ross
December 22, 2016

One very wise community member shared with us that transparency isn’t about giving a release date but rather being open about milestones and what’s happening along the way. With that spirit in mind, I wanted to give you an update on where we are with releasing the next version of the Jibo SDK.

Developing Skills for Jibo

Andrew Rapo
December 20, 2016

The Theater of Jibo Jibo is a unique platform with features that enable a new class of application: social skills. Jibo is built on a familiar mobile device architecture, the NVIDIA Tegra K1, which provides all the capabilities of a traditional smartphone or tablet. But it is Jibo’s form factor and physical animation system that enable his defining, social interactions.

Flows- A Dungeon Example

Andrew Rapo
December 8, 2016

Flows

As seen in previous posts and example, flows provide a visual mechanism for describing the flow-of-control for a skill. The SDK’s Flow Editor is used to create .flow files, which are converted (compiled) to JavaScript during the skill’s build process. Flows are especially useful for describing the complex logic required by Jibo’s Voice User Interface (VUI).

Hacking Arts 2016 at MIT Media Lab Invites Jibo to Join

Justin Woo
November 28, 2016

Jibo had a chance to visit co-founder Cynthia Breazeal’s stomping grounds at the MIT MediaLab for Hacking Arts 2016. This is a unique event that brings together creative technologists, artists, innovators and hackers to explore the future of the arts. The annual event consists of three components: a conference, Tech Expo and Hackathon.

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